The Palmetto Insider

The blog of the South Carolina Policy Council

Budget Crisis Long in Coming

with 2 comments

Despite all the rhetoric about budget cuts and employee furloughs, South Carolina’s FY10-2011 budget was the largest in state history. The total state budget was $21.149 billion. This includes: $8.268 billion in Federal Funds; $7.766 billion in Other Funds; and $5.115 billion in General Funds. That’s an increase of $500 million or 2.19 percent over last year. The increase comes mostly from increased fine and fee revenue and one-time federal stimulus dollars.

But this year’s budget increases are not an isolated phenomenon. Over the past 10 years:

  • The total state budget increased by 44.49 percent (FY2002 to FY2011).
  • The budget increased by 4.14 percent annually.
  • The budget increased every year, except one (FY2010).
  • In the five-year period (FY2003-FY2008) prior to the beginning of the current recession, the total budget increased 34.56 percent, going up by more than $5 billion.

According to the Mercatus Center, South Carolina’s state and local government spending relative to personal income is 26 percent – 5th highest in the country. In other words, local and state government spends 26 cents of every dollar earned by South Carolina’s people. Similarly, government spending accounts for 23 cents of every dollar of Gross State Product (GSP) – 4th highest in the country.

Debt is another serious problem. South Carolina government is carrying $40 billion in debt, including state, local, and school district debt, as well as unfunded liabilities on public employee pensions and post-retirement health benefits. State and local governmental outstanding debt accounts for 22 percent of GSP – again, 4th highest in the nation.

So we have high spending and high debt relative to income and GSP. What does that get us?

An unemployment rate of 11 percent – 6th highest in the nation (as of September 2010) and a median household income of $42,442, which is 42nd lowest in the nation (as of 2009). Our surrounding neighbors have unemployment rates of 9.6 percent (North Carolina), 8.9 percent (Alabama), 10 percent (Georgia), and 9.4 percent (Tennessee). A pretty uncompetitive situation for the Palmetto State.

It goes without saying that South Carolina is suffering from a budget and spending crisis – and it’s good to know governor-elect Haley recognizes this. But the crisis is not new. It comes from years of fiscal mismanagement and poor budgetary practices. None of these problems were addressed during the 2010 session. It’ll be interesting to see how legislators respond in 2011.

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Written by SCPC

November 22, 2010 at 10:15 am

2 Responses

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  1. […] the state is deliberating the budget and spending crisis, perhaps one of the opportunities is to implement detailed and long-term solution reforms for the […]

  2. […] the state is deliberating the budget and spending crisis, perhaps one of the opportunities is to implement detailed and long-term solution reforms for the […]


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